Erebia eriphyle (Freyer, 1836)


Erebia eriphyle: Male (Lüner See, W-Austria, early July 2011, 2200m above sea level) [N] Erebia eriphyle: Male (Lüner See, early July 2011, 2200m above sea level) [N] Erebia eriphyle: Female (e.o. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Lower side [S] Erebia eriphyle: Female, Allgaeu Alps [N] Erebia eriphyle: Female (Allgaeu Alps) [N] Erebia eriphyle: Ovum [S] Erebia eriphyle: L1-larva (e.l. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: L1-larva (e.l. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: L2-larva (e.l. N-Alpen) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in penultimate instar (e.l. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in penultimate instar (e.l. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in penultimate instar (e.l. N-Alps) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva after the last moult  [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva after the last moult  [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in last instar (e.o. N-Alps 2007/2008) [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in last instar [S] Erebia eriphyle: Larva in last instar lateral [S] Erebia eriphyle: Pupa lateral [S] Erebia eriphyle: Pupa ventral [S] Erebia eriphyle: Pupa dorsal [S] Erebia eriphyle: Habitat: fresh meadows with tall herbs in the subalpine stage in the Allgaeu Alps [N] Erebia eriphyle: Habitat (forb community) in the Rätikon, west Austrian Alps (Lüner See, early July 2011, 22200m above sea level) [N] Erebia eriphyle: Habitat (forb community) in the Rätikon, west Austrian Alps (Lüner See, early July 2011, 22200m above sea level) [N] Erebia eriphyle: Habitat (forb community with single Alnus viridis) in the Rätikon, west Austrian Alps (Lüner See, early July 2011, 22200m above sea level) [N]

Host plants:
Grasses such as Deschampsia caespitosa

Habitat:
Erebia eriphyle is typical of humid forb communities with Adenostyles species, Petasites and others. It occurs often in the loose green alder belt.

Life cycle:
The development takes two years (Sonderegger 2005). At first, the larva hibernates within the egg (rarely already outside) as it is the case in the related species Erebia ligea, E. euryale and E. manto. The second hibernation takes place in penultimate instar. The caterpillars live quite hidden and are searched only at night with some prospect of success. The adults fly in July and August. For example in deteriorating weather, the butterflies sit occasionally with closed wings on the large upper leaf surface perennials (Gentiana, Adenostyles etc.).

Endangerment factors:
The local species can be quickly threatened by development measures (tourism) and overgrazing.

Remarks:
Erebia eriphyle is endemic to the Alps and is found there rather north of the main ridge. In Germany it is found primarily in the southern Allgäu Alps (SW-Bavaria), or more rarely in the Berchtesgaden mountains.



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