Erebia neoridas (Boisduval, 1828)


Erebia neoridas: Male (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Male [S] Erebia neoridas: Male [S] Erebia neoridas: Male (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Several males on Carlina acaulis (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female [S] Erebia neoridas: Female (Cuneo, late August 2010) [N] Erebia neoridas: Female [S] Erebia neoridas: Ovum [S] Erebia neoridas: Ovum after some days [S] Erebia neoridas: L1 [S] Erebia neoridas: L1 [S] Erebia neoridas: Young larva after the hibernation [S] Erebia neoridas: Young larva lateral [S] Erebia neoridas: Young larva after the hibernation [S] Erebia neoridas: Half-grown larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Half-grown larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva in penultimate instar [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva in penultimate instar [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva in penultimate instar [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva after the last moult  [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva after the last moult  [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Larva [S] Erebia neoridas: Pupa [S] Erebia neoridas: Pupa [S] Erebia neoridas: Pupa dorsal [S] Erebia neoridas: Habitat in the SW-Alps near Cuneo in ca. 1300m above sea level, late August 2010 [N]

Host plants:
The caterpillar feeds on drought-resistant grasses, particularly tussock-forming like Festuca.

Habitat:
Erebia neoridas inhabits hot dry locations, particularly bushy slopes with dry grasslands and steppe-like vegetation. Sometimes the butterflies are also observed on clearings in dry mountain forests. Erebia neoridas flies between 500 and 2100m above sea level (usually less than 1700m above sea level).

Life cycle:
The adults fly in late summer from late July to late September with a focus on mid- to late August. The eggs are attached to dry and even living grasses near the ground. The young caterpillar overwinters (L1 or L2). The caterpillars are fully-grown in late June or in July. The butterflies visit flowers often in large numbers (Carlina acaulis, Centaurea, etc.).

Endangerment factors:
At lower altitudes, Erebia neoridas looses habitats by the expansionism of the people (overbuilding, intensification), but on the other hand also by abandonment of grazing or late mowing and subsequent reforestation. Overall, Erebia neoridas is still relatively common and still not threatened severely.

Remarks:
Erebia neoridas occurs mainly in the Southwestern Alps (Italy/France). It is especially common in parts of the Alpi marittime (Italy). Besides, it is found locally in Central Italy, in the Massif Central, the Pyrenees and the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain).



Erebia aethiops | Erebia alberganus | Erebia calcaria | Erebia cassioides | Erebia claudina | Erebia epiphron | Erebia epistygne | Erebia eriphyle | Erebia euryale | Erebia flavofasciata | Erebia gorge | Erebia lefebvrei | Erebia ligea | Erebia manto | Erebia medusa | Erebia melampus | Erebia melas | Erebia meolans | Erebia mnestra | Erebia montana | Erebia nivalis | Erebia oeme | Erebia orientalis | Erebia ottomana | Erebia palarica | Erebia pandrose | Erebia pharte | Erebia pluto | Erebia pronoe | Erebia rhodopensis | Erebia rondoui | Erebia scipio | Erebia sthennyo | Erebia stirius | Erebia styx | Erebia sudetica | Erebia triaria | Erebia tyndarus | Erebia zapateri