Lasiommata maera (Linnaeus, 1758)


Lasiommata maera: Male (Allgaeu, Hinterstein, 1400m asl, June 2014) [N] Lasiommata maera: Male (Allgaeu, Hinterstein, 1400m asl, June 2014) [N] Lasiommata maera: Courtship (female open), Allgaeu, Kemptener Wald, July 2014 [N] Lasiommata maera: Adult (Montafon) [S] Lasiommata maera: Adult (Montafon) [S] Lasiommata maera: Male (Black Forest, early July 2011) [N] Lasiommata maera: Male (e.l. Provence, France) [S] Lasiommata maera: Male (e.l. Provence, France) [S] Lasiommata maera: Male (e.l. Provence, France) [S] Lasiommata maera: Upper side [S] Lasiommata maera: Lower side [N] Lasiommata maera: Half-grown larva (eastern Swabian Alb, Southern Germany) [M] Lasiommata maera: Half-grown larva (Montafon) [N] Lasiommata maera: Larva (eastern Swabian Alb, Southern Germany) [S] Lasiommata maera: Larva (Provence, France, April 2010) [M] Lasiommata maera: Larva (Spanish west Pyrenees, early July 2010, 1900m above sea level) [M] Lasiommata maera: Larva (e.l. Montafon, W-Austria) [S] Lasiommata maera: Larva (Montafon) [S] Lasiommata maera: Larva (Montafon) [S] Lasiommata maera: Larva [N] Lasiommata maera: Pupa [S] Lasiommata maera: Pupa [S] Lasiommata maera: Habitat on the eastern Swabian Jura: rocky, bushy grassland at woodland edge (2007) [N] Lasiommata maera: Habitat on the eastern Swabian Jura: rocky grassland clearing in light beech forest (2007) [N] Lasiommata maera: Another type of habitat are larger clearings or storm damage areas, preferably those which still border to higher trees and habe a high density of old tree stumps and vertical root plates (rock substitution). But in recent decades, these habitats are in decline (eutrophication, single tree selection etc.). Eastern Swabian Alb 2007. [N]

Host plants:
The caterpilalr feeds on grasses (Poaceae) like Brachypodium pinnatum, Bromus erectus, Melica and Festuca.

Habitat:
Lasiommata maera inhabits mountainous grasslands near forests, rocky slopes, alpine meadows in the forest zone, clearcuttings, and occasionally quarries (in the lowlands).

Life cycle:
Usually, a single generation is formed. In the lowlands apparently occurs also a partial second generation. The adult flies usually in June/July in elevations of about 600m above sea level (in the Alps also in August). When there are two generations, you may expect adults between May and September. Eggs are deposited on grass blades at tree trunk bases, rocks, on the edge of open spots etc. The winter is usually passed as an L3.

Endangerment: regionally endangered or decreasing

Endangerment factors:
This species is in strong decline especially in the lowlands due to darkening processes in the forests. Near Memmingen (Southern Germany), where I observed sometimes very abundant populations in many forests around 1988-1990, it is nowadays extinct since the grassy fringes and clearings have almost vanished and the remaining suffer from eutrophication and still denser afforestation. The butterfly is still more common only in regions with denser occurrence of rocky grasslands near forests as the Swabian Alb or of forest gap systems like the entire Alpine region.

Remarks:
The distribution ranges from Northwest Africa across Europe and temperate Asia to Siberia.



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