Stauropus fagi (Linnaeus, 1758)


Stauropus fagi: Male [S] Stauropus fagi: Male (Waldshut-Tiengen, S-Germany, April 2011, found at a petrol station) [M] Stauropus fagi: Larva (Olympus, Greece, July 2008) [N] Stauropus fagi: Larva (Olympus, Greece, July 2008) [N] Stauropus fagi: Larva (Olympus, Greece, July 2008) [N] Stauropus fagi: Larva [M]

Host plants:
The caterpillar lives on deciduous woods. I found caterpillars on Salix caprea, Prunus spinosa, Prunus padus, Cornus sanguinea, Corylus avellana and Malus. According to literature, Fagus should be the main host plant, which is truely correct.

Habitat:
Stauropus fagi inhabits forests and more rarely also parks and gardens. Caterpillars are usually found in dark, air-moist, shady places.

Life cycle:
Stauropus fagi flies in a single generation per year with elongated appearence time. Here are discussed two genetically fixed strains. According to my breeding experience, I think the following is more likely: in some of the pupae (especially with earlier pupation in July/August), the moth develops in the autumn in the pupa and flies so as early as April/May. Otherwise (late pupation and no significant development in the autumn), the average flight time is later (June to early August). The most bizarre caterpillars can be found from June to early October.

Endangerment factors:
Stauropus fagi is unthreatened, but usually not very numerous.

Remarks:
Stauropus fagi occurs from Northern Spain through Europe and temperate Asia to Japan.