Orgyia antiqua (Linnaeus, 1758)


Orgyia antiqua: Male [S] Orgyia antiqua: Male [S] Orgyia antiqua: Male [S] Orgyia antiqua: Female [S] Orgyia antiqua: Ovae in the winter [N] Orgyia antiqua: Ovae [N] Orgyia antiqua: Ovae (detail) [N] Orgyia antiqua: Young larva [M] Orgyia antiqua: Young larva [S] Orgyia antiqua: Larva [S] Orgyia antiqua: Larva [S] Orgyia antiqua: Larva [S] Orgyia antiqua: Larva [N] Orgyia antiqua: Female pupa [S] Orgyia antiqua: Female pupa [S] Orgyia antiqua: Female pupa [S]

Host plants:
The species is polyphagous, They feed often on trees and bishes (Prunus, Salix, Quercus, etc.), but also on conifers and other plants. In my youth, I bred the species in winter from clutches of eggs found at spruce branches with Picea and found larvae on Geranium sp. in an urban park in Memmingen (Germany).

Habitat:
Orgyia antiqua inhabits in particular forests and hedgerows, but also occurs in all other habitats, especially when woody plants are available.

Life cycle:
Orgyia antiqua occurs from a single up to partial three generations with moth from June to October. Usually already the second generation is not quite complete. Larvae occur from May to early September. The wingless female lays her eggs on the outside of the pupal cocoon where they hibernate. In winter, the cocoons that are usually attached to perennials and shrubs or trees higher above ground are conspicuous.

Endangerment factors:
Orgyia antiqua is not endangered. However, even this species is often not as frequent as it used to be.

Remarks:
Orgyia antiqua is missing in the Alps above about 1400m above sea level (higher in the south). According to literature, male larvae moult four times and female five times (SBN 2000).

Orgyia antiqua shows an holarctic distribution (much of Europe except for Southern Spain, temperate Asia and North America).



Orgyia aurolimbata | Orgyia rupestris